5 comments

  1. Very interesting! I love these Christian histories that slip through the cracks too often.

    I was wondering – and you don’t have to do a whole sketchcast for this – was it possible that Cain killed Abel before the whole family was kicked out of the Garden of Eden?

    My friend and I were talking earlier today and he was arguing the Genesis contradicts itself in that it tells the story of creation twice: the first time day-by-day, and the second time it starts with Adam. I tried to assuage his protest with an explanation of Hebraic writing styles and how modern English literature is handcuffed into being chronological rather than topical.

    Anyway, this got me thinking. I mean, I’ve heard before that it was likely that Eve had children before they left the garden, is it also possible that Cain murdered before they left, too? It says that he ended up wandering to the East of Eden, which may mean right outside of Eden.

    Well, let me know what you think (Rob or anyone else)!

  2. Thank you for the history lesson. I will take your advice and pray for all the leaders.

    How do we know if our prayers are contrary to God’s plan I wonder? It seems like that might not be the best way to spend our energy and emotion.

    Maybe while we are connected to God through prayer he might tell us we are praying for an 0utcome contrary to His plan. More mysteries posed to us with every tidbit of knowledge we gain so it seems.

    Seems like God’s plan is hard to figure out sometimes whether it be the future or the distant past as in Brad’s example. Speaking of Brad’s example my answer would be – who knows?

    God Bless

  3. Brad- While you deftly pointed out that chronological order isn’t the top priority of ancient Eastern writers…we don’t know for sure that Cain and Able were born outside of Eden, but we do believe that the murder took place post-fall, after the expulsion. The story is designed to show the immediate result of abandoning God’s will for our own; isolation (removal from the garden and communion with God), envy, hatred, murder and on and on.
    Good observations!

    Tom- I really think that when the Bible is encouraging us to pray for our leaders, the idea isn’t so much to pray for a specific outcome as much as it is to pray that God will guide them, give them wisdom, promote a desire for justice, etc.
    When I do pray for specific outcomes (ie: I pray for peace and an end to this war every day), I always couch it in the paramiters of His will (“If it’s Your will, let this war end, have mercy on this nation…”).
    Does that make any sense?

  4. Right on.

    Oh, by the way, two Rabbi Encounter updates in like a week: simply narly. Keep it going. Soon enough you should have a graphic novel New Testament on your hands…

  5. Praying for God to give leaders wisdom and good sense seems like the best we can do. It seems like riding shotgun and holding the map with all the possible routes and asking, “So where are we going Lord?” and/or “Would you mind if we turned down the radio a bit and we can discuss what your intensions are here?” Feeling lost or stupid about God’s plan must be a common denominator for many of us, no matter that so many authorities on television claim prophetical understanding.

    Its good to have a places to go like Eastgate and Wonderwhat where one can count on honesty, sincerity, and His love!

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